A LOSS OF PLACE

INstallation: MOTOROLA CELL PHONES WITH SPECIALLY CREATED VIDEOS

grief and displacement in real life versus the digital landscape of cell phones

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PHONES ARE A LANDSCAPE WE LIVE IN.

I’m tired of poor arguments stating that cell phones effect people negatively. That’s a bad oversimplification. The nature of cell phones is to take us to many places at once. Phones take us somewhere else, and it is a real place.

No matter who you are, when your idea of “home” is uprooted and lost, you go through the grieving process as if it died. My experiences of my phone are colored by the fact that I am immigrant from Venezuela, which also effects my sense of place and family. For 21st century immigrants, cell phones are a landscape for grieving loss of place, while staying connected to that place. While preceding immigrant generations were forced (for lack of easy communication) to let go of connections to family and culture, many 21st century immigrants hold on through phones, apps, and the internet.

Phone are a very real landscape—completely separate and completely united to “real life“—where I experience the grief (and joy) of being an immigrant. A Loss of Place invites spectators to what that landscape looks like for me: I offer you the opportunity to unlock my phone.

 
 
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San Francisco, California

My digital work, "Loss of Place", debuted at a gallery curated by Caroline Horswill. The gallery—aptly titled "Sense of Place" and located in San Francisco—provided an opportunity to discuss identities as shaped by place, and related topics like rooting, uprooting, immigration, displacement, gentrification, and houselessness.

Learn more about the entire exhibit: SublimeCaroline.com/a-sense-of-place/